1958 Ad US Savings Bonds Norman Rockwell Art Freedom Speech Treasury YSFC3

206568_YSFC3_083

This is an original 1958 black and white print ad for US Savings Bonds that featured artwork of an American advocating his freedom of speech.

CONDITION

This 54+ year old Item is rated Very Fine +. There is light bleedthrough on this piece from the verso. Some light surface rub. Small chip - bottom left corner.

  • Product Type: Original Print Ad; Black / White
  • Grade: Very Fine +
  • Dimensions: Approximately 5.25 x 7.5 inches; 13 x 19 cm
  • Authentication: Serial-Numbered Certificate of Authenticity w/ Full Provenance
  • Protection: Packaged in a custom archival sleeve with an acid-free black board (great for display, gift-giving, and preservation)

To infinity and beyond! Period Paper is excited to launch, (pun intended), a collection of 1950s era Astounding Science Fiction magazine covers that feature artwork that's truly out-of-this-world! Initially published in 1929, Astounding Science Fiction , (later changed to Analog Science Fact & Fiction in 1960), is the longest running, continuously published magazine of the sci-fi genre. As if that factoid wasn't impressive enough, issues of the magazine can even be found, (probably floating), inside the library of the International Space Station! Blast off and enjoy orbiting through the breathtaking, (there's no air in space remember?), artwork by stars such as Frank Kelly Freas, Henry Richard Van Dongen, and Ed Emshwiller. Try not to make a total ass-tronaut out of yourself as you enjoy pointing and mocking the Leeminorrians, Tenebrans, Centrans, Martian, and other alien lifeforms you encounter! Wander through the Kyrt fields of Florina, feel the weight of Mesklin's gravity, or sail the seas of Rathe! But make sure to watch out for cross-dressing, prairie-bonnet wearing, slave traders of the Wizard crime syndicate (Houston, we have a problem)! Even with everything this "final frontier" has to see and explore, there's simply no need to "light speed" your way through it. So, to continue your interplanetary cruise, (trust us, it's not rocket science), simply click on the link provided below the condition paragraph.

This piece was illustrated by Rockwell, Norman Perceval. Artist signature in print - top right of image.

Norman Rockwell

(1894-1978) Norman Perceval Rockwell was born in New York City but he was best known and beloved for his nostalgic images of small town and rural America. He studied at the Chase School of Fine and Applied Art, the National Academy of Design, and the Art Students League and was influenced by the work of Howard Pyle and J. C. LeyendeckerÑtwo great illustrators of the period. He began his career with illustrations for the St. Nicholas magazine and other juvenile publications but he is most associated with The Saturday Evening Post for which he did more than 300 covers beginning in 1916. In addition to his magazine and advertising work he produced the famous Four Freedoms posters during WWII. His work captured the innocence of an America now long gone and with each drawing Rockwell told a story with considerable warmth and humor. With his prolific output and huge audience, Rockwell is perhaps the artist most responsible for raising the genre of illustration to the art form we consider it to be today.

Keywords specific to this image: Vintage Advertising, Civil Liberties, Political, Government, United States, Patriotic, Financial, Banking, Money, Town Hall Meeting, Public Service Announcement, Peace Power, America, Bill of Rights, Constitution

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